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SPORTS BRIEFS

Le 3 août 2017, 05:57 dans Humeurs 0


BASKETBALL

NBA to host three NBL teams

Three NBA teams are to host opponents from Australia’s National Basketball League (NBL) for pre-season games in October. The Utah Jazz, who feature Australians Joe Ingles and Dante Exum, are to host the Sydney Kings on Oct. 2. Ingles was chosen NBL Rookie of the Year after playing with the Melbourne South Dragons in 2006-2007. Exum was the No. 5 overall pick in the 2014 NBA draft. NBA Most Valuable Player Russell Westbrook and the Oklahoma City Thunder are to host Melbourne United on Oct. 8, while the Phoenix Suns welcome the Brisbane Bullets on Oct. 13. This is to be the first time NBL teams travel to the US to play NBA teams. The NBA on Monday said that there were a record-tying eight Australian players on last season’s opening-night NBA rosters.

CYCLING

Dylan Teuns wins third stage

BMC’s Dylan Teuns won Monday’s mountainous stage three of the Tour de Pologne ahead of Peter Sagan and his teammate, local rider Rafal Majka. The results put Sagan back in the overall lead six seconds ahead of Teuns and 12 seconds ahead of Majka as overnight leader Danny van Poppel, a sprinter, drops out of the top 10. Belgian rider Teuns launched a sudden attack on the final climb to a summit finish at Szczyrk, but world road race champion Sagan dug deep to limit the damage and retake the yellow jersey. The 161km stage featured four climbs, but there are more challenging mountain stages to come in the eight-day event.

GOLF

McIlroy fired caddie: reports

Rory McIlroy has fired his caddie and is to employ his best friend at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational and the PGA Championship, media outlets reported. Reuters cited a source it did not identify as saying McIlroy has parted ways with J.P. Fitzgerald. They have worked together over the past nine years, during which McIlroy has won four major championships and reached No. 1 in the world. McIlroy is expected to speak about the change today at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational. The Telegraph reported that McIlroy’s caddie at the next two tournaments would be Harry Diamond. If confirmed, it would be the second significant player-caddie split this summer after Phil Mickelson and Jim “Bones” Mackay decided to end 25 years together. Mackay has since taken a job as an analyst on the course at NBC Sports.

RUGBY UNION

Mauger to coach Otago

Former All Blacks center Aaron Mauger was yesterday appointed head coach of the Otago Highlanders under a three-year deal with the New Zealand Super Rugby club. Mauger said he was excited at the prospect of joining the Highlanders, who won the competition in 2015 and were quarter-finalists this season. “The club has become a consistent performer at the top of the competition in recent years and we look forward to the challenge of growing our game and achieving great things,” he said. Mauger, 36, played 45 Tests for New Zealand and made 89 appearances for the Canterbury Crusaders. After a chronic back injury forced him to hang up his boots in 2010, he was an assistant coach with the Crusaders before joining the coaching team at Leicester Tigers in 2015.

he went home as sad as ever

Le 17 mai 2017, 05:45 dans Humeurs 0

‘Tell me how I can reach you?’ cried he; but Wildrose smiled and shook her head, and sat down quietly .

The prince saw that it was no use, and turned and made his way out of the forest. But he might as well have stayed there, for any good he was to his father, so full was his heart of longing for Wildrose. Twice he returned to the forest in the hopes of finding her, but this time fortune failed him,

At length the emperor, who could not think what had caused this change, sent for his son and asked him what was the matter. Then the prince confessed that the image of Wildrose filled his soul, and that he would never be happy without her. At first the emperor felt rather distressed. He doubted whether a girl from a tree top would make a good empress; but he loved his son so much that he promised to do all he could to find her. So the next morning heralds were sent forth throughout the whole land to inquire if anyone knew where a maiden could be found who lived in a forest on the top of a tree, and to promise great riches and a place at court to any person who should find her. But nobody knew. All the girls in the kingdom had their homes on the ground, and laughed at the notion of being brought up in a tree. ‘A nice kind of empress she would make,’ they said, as the emperor had done, tossing their heads with disdain; for, having read many books, they guessed what she was wanted for .

The heralds were almost in despair, when an old woman stepped out of the crowd and came and spoke to them. She was not only very old, but she was very ugly, with a hump on her back and a bald head, and when the heralds saw her they broke into rude laughter. ‘I can show you the maiden who lives in the tree-top,’ she said, but they only laughed the more loudly.

‘Get away, old witch!’ they cried, ‘you will bring us bad luck’; but the old woman stood firm, and declared that she alone knew where to find the maiden.

‘Go with her,’ said the eldest of the heralds at last. ‘The emperor’s orders are clear, that whoever knew anything of the maiden was to come at once to court. Put her in the coach and take her with us.’

So in this fashion the old woman was brought to court.

‘You have declared that you can bring hither the maiden from the wood?’ said the emperor, who was seated on his throne.

‘Yes, your Majesty, and I will keep my word,’ said she.

‘Then bring her at once,’ said the emperor.

‘Give me first a kettle and a tripod,’ asked the old w omen, and the emperor ordered them to be brought instantly. The old woman picked them up, and tucking them under her arm went on her way, keeping at a little distance behind the royal huntsmen, who in their turn followed the prince.

Oh, what a noise that old woman made as she walked along! She chattered to herself so fast and clattered her kettle so loudly that you would have thought that a whole campful of gipsies must be coming round the next corner. But when they reached the forest, she bade them all wait outside, and entered the dark wood by herself.

She stopped underneath the tree where the maiden dwelt and, gathering some dry sticks, kindled a fire. Next, she placed the tripod over it, and the kettle on top. But something was the matter with the kettle. As fast as the old woman put it where it was to stand, that kettle was sure to roll off, falling to the ground with a crash.

It really seemed bewitched, and no one knows what might have happened if Wildrose, who had been all the time peeping out of her nest, had not lost patience at the old woman’s stupidity, and cried out: ‘The tripod won’t stand on that hill, you must move it!’

‘But where am I to move it to, my child?’ asked the old woman, looking up to the nest, and at the same moment trying to steady the kettle with one hand and the tripod with the other reenex.

‘Didn’t I tell you that it was no good doing that,’ said Wildrose, more impatiently than before. ‘Make a fire near a tree and hang the kettle from one of the branches.’

Once upon a time there lived

Le 20 avril 2017, 05:35 dans Humeurs 0

 a poor widow who had one little boy. At first sight you would not have thought that he was different from a thousand other little boys; but then you noticed that by his side hung the scabbard of a sword, and as the boy grew bigger the scabbard grew bigger too. The sword which belonged to the scabbard was found by the little boy sticking out of the ground in the garden, and every day he pulled it up to see if it would go into the scabbard. But though it was plainly becoming longer and longer dermes, it was some time before the two would fit.

However, there came a day at last when it slipped in quite easily. The child was so delighted that he could hardly believe his eyes, so he tried it seven times, and each time it slipped in more easily than before. But pleased though the boy was, he determined not to tell anyone about it, particularly not his mother, who never could keep anything from her neighbours.

Still, in spite of his resolutions, he could not hide altogether that something had happened, and when he went in to breakfast his mother asked him what was the matter.

‘Oh, mother, I had such a nice dream last night,’ said he; ‘but I can’t tell it to anybody.’

‘You can tell it to me,’ she answered. ‘It must have been a nice dream, or you wouldn’t look so happy.’

‘No, mother; I can’t tell it to anybody,’ returned the boy, ‘till it comes true.’

‘I want to know what it was, and know it I will,’ cried she, ‘and I will beat you till you tell me.’

But it was no use, neither words nor blows would get the secret out of the boy; and when her arm was quite tired and she had to leave off, the child, sore and aching, ran into the garden and knelt weeping beside his little sword. It was working round and round in its hole all by itself dermes, and if anyone except the boy had tried to catch hold of it, he would have been badly cut. But the moment he stretched out his hand it stopped and slid quietly into the scabbard.

For a long time the child sat sobbing, and the noise was heard by the king as he was driving by. ‘Go and see who it is that is crying so,’ said he to one of his servants, and the man went. In a few minutes he returned saying: ‘Your Majesty, it is a little boy who is kneeling there sobbing because his mother has beaten him.’

‘Bring him to me at once,’ commanded the monarch, ‘and tell him that it is the king who sends for him, and that he has never cried in all his life and cannot bear anyone else to do so.’ On receiving this message the boy dried his tears and went with the servant to the royal carriage. ‘Will you be my son?’ asked the king.

‘Yes, if my mother will let me,’ answered the boy. And the king bade the servant go back to the mother and say that if she would give her boy to him, he should live in the palace and marry his prettiest daughter as soon as he was a man.

The widow’s anger now turned into joy, and she came running to the splendid coach and kissed the king’s hand. ‘I hope you will be more obedient to his Majesty than you were to me,’ she said; and the boy shrank away half-frightened. But when she had gone back to her cottage, he asked the king if he might fetch something that he had left in the garden, and when he was given permission, he pulled up his little sword, which he slid into the scabbard.

Then he climbed into the coach and was driven away.

After they had gone some distance the king said: ‘Why were you crying so bitterly in the garden just now?’

‘Because my mother had been beating me,’ replied the boy.

‘And what did she do that for?’ asked the king again.

‘Because I would not tell her my dream.’

‘And why wouldn’t you tell it to her?’

‘Because I will never tell it to anyone till it comes true,’ answered the boy.

‘And won’t you tell it to me either?’ asked the king in surprise.

‘No, not even to you, your Majesty,’ replied he.

‘Oh, I am sure you will when we get home,’ said the king smiling, and he talked to him about other things till they came to the palace dermes.

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